Robinsonia Crusoe

“Imagine you’re in prison,” I suggested, transatlantically, to my unhappy sister, knowing at once that it was the wrong choice of image. But too late, so I ploughed on. “Think of yourself in your small cell, with bars at the windows – after the first shock you’d look for things to do, little routines. You might make friends with a spider or – a rat – or something. You might, um, invent an exercise routine that required – very little room – and get really, really fit. You might turn flagstones into hopscotch – there’s bound to be a bit of chalk sort of lying about, isn’t there? Maybe you could make a chess set out of – um – tiny bit of paper – and – ”

“But I don’t play chess.”

“No, neither do I. But if we did – ”

“But you wouldn’t be there to play it with me, would you? Even if you played chess. Because I’d probably be sharing a cell with the female equivalent of Jack The Ripper.”

Afterward, I realised a better metaphor would have been the desert island. “You are Robinsonia Crusoe, and you have been shipwrecked – or possibly set ashore by brigands – I’ve never read the actual book – on a Beautiful Desert Island. That’s just what three months, or possibly months and months more, forbidden to leave the house because of some piddling little plague is like. And what would you do on your – um – Canadian desert island? After the first shock you’d look for things to do, little routines. You might teach yourself to swim underwater, in those warm, clear, tropical seas. You might observe the glossy turtles and their midnight mating rituals. Make copious notes, publish a paper someday. You might make a set of drums out of coconut shells (having eaten the delicious fruit and drunk all that lovely milk first). You might – ”

We were discussing coping strategies. She has a few strategies, but not very highly developed. I have a few strategies, but am somewhat exaggerating their effectiveness. Tell the truth, I’m probably as unhappy as she is. What presses her depression-buttons is being stuck indoors, unable to get away from The House where she had to watch her husband die, rather horribly, not all that long ago.

What presses my depression buttons is a phobia, or neurosis. It’s being afraid of running out of things, of “not having enough”, of scratching around, in increasing desperation, for the things I have less or less of. I tell myself it was probably Mum’s fault – something to do with breast-feeding, all those years ago! In normal circumstances I work round this neurotic fault line and pretend, even to myself, that it isn’t there. I buy two of everything. I store stuff. I have visions of the far-too-many cats starving to death before my eyes, and having to watch, and having to decide whether to starve myself to death at the same time, rather than watch, and …

Well, so now you know. It’s daft, but now I’m not supposed to go out because of the “underlying health condition” (not that I’ve had the NHS letter, which according to the “conditions” list, I should have qualified for – which is also winding me up) so the  permitted expedition to the supermarket, with its straggling “spaced” queues and trolley-disinfecting stations is a risk not really worth taking. But worst of all, there are no slots at all left for online supermarket ordering. The whole system has – temporarily, one hopes – ground to a halt. It’s not that I need anything at the moment. It’s that I couldn’t get anything – I’m in an alleyway with no exit to it, pursued by gun-toting cops. At this point, panic begins to set in. The starved cat, starved human fantasies start up –

So, that’s my demon, or at least, the particular demon this situation is feeding. I suspect everyone, over this whole silly little hillside at the edge of the sea; over this whole country; over this whole shut-in world, is coming face to face with their own.

Nevertheless, one is coping, as Her Majesty would say. (Poor old Charlie – even he’s got it.) One is Soldiering On. I’m trying to take my own prison cell/desert island advice and have started on a range of projects. They are very long term projects, and so hopefully will outlast the current crisis. I think it’s important not to be focusing on the short term, somehow. I like the idea of continuity, beyond this. The idea is to have more projects on the go than you could do in one day. But you imagine you might do a bit of them each day, and in imagining you give yourself things to look forward to.

So, this is what I am doing, or about to do:

Patchwork quilt, English paper-piecing method, hand-sewn, tiny stitches. So far I’ve designed my basic block, and made one up. Was greatly helped by some Over 50s Life Assurance bumf through the door – exactly the right weight of paper for the templates.

Reading. At the moment, At Mrs Lippincote’s by Elizabeth Taylor (not the one with the eyebrows and Richard Burton – the other one) for, I think, the third time. It’s one of those rare books you keep finding something new in. Next, I think, Villette.

Also, Dickens’ Hard Times. About 20 years ago, grasped by a sudden obsession, and being better off then, I bought the complete set of Dickens. Cheapish paperbacks, of course, not leather-bound, gold-embossed, marbled boards, etc. A parallel reading project – Dickens plus something else.

Origami cranes – one a day, for no other reason than I have a batch of origami paper to use up, and I can only make cranes. Maybe I could string them, and hang the strings up in the front window pour encourager les autres.

Writing – I have four exercise books full of unused flash fiction ideas.

Really complicated dishcloths – all those knitting patterns I looked at and thought – what the – ? I tackled the first repeat of “Crocus Buds” today (not quite as horrendous as “Shapely Diamond” at the back of the book). I actually got it right, but then momentarily lost concentration watching politics at the same time, dropped a stitch and couldn’t retrieve the situation. Pulled it all off the needle. Cast on another 45 stitches –

And so on. And so forth.

Time to grow out the moustache?

Until this morning I could think of very few positives to the coronavirus situation. As I have said before, choosing to be a hermit is one thing – having hermitry, hermitage or possibly hermitonomy imposed upon one by the Government is another. I self-isolated of my own accord a week early, knowing I was “at risk”, but now I am being compelled to I am sad. Three months, a whole summer confined with a herd of cats, trying to track down cans of catfood. If the worst really comes to the worst they will have to hold their noses and tackle the Bozita. The Bozita has been in the garage for a year. Not only would they not eat it when I bought it, they wouldn’t go within a yard of it.

But this morning I woke up with an idea. Well, I was woken up, forcibly, by Martha, my self-appointed “alarm cat”. She sees it as her duty to push, jump, scratch, dribble most persistently, hour upon hour if necessary, until I drag myself out of bed. My idea?

Let the moustache grow out!!

When will there ever be a better opportunity? Three months of seeing no one except the odd delivery driver – and delivery drivers never look at you. And now, they are so anxious to get away they linger even less. As the Tesco man said, “If you admit to symptoms we will drop your shopping on the doorstep and run away.”

I would not like anyone to think that I am, in my natural state, a grotesquely bearded lady. As far as I remember – back to when I was twelve or thirteen – the moustache was really only what you might expect to appear on a brown-haired English girl. But in those days – we’re talking Sixties, before Women’s Lib – neither facial not armpit hair was acceptable. Girls aimed to look like Twiggy – vacant, pale, pure and skinny. If it was an eyelash, you loaded it with mascara, liberally lubricated with spit. If it was in an armpit, you shaved it. If it was under your nose you bleached, tweezed, shaved, waxed, chemically removed – in fact bazooka’d it in any way you could.

We had a French girl at our school once, on an exchange visit. She was incredibly glamorous, we felt, until we all went to play tennis after school. My God, the girl was hiding a dead hamster under either arm. The horror of it! Poor girl. I hope she took no notice of our titters.

So – three months – maybe more – of not zapping the moustache. It occurs to me that since I am going grey – well pepper-and-salt, anyway – maybe el bigote will come out a soft, wispy grey. If it turns out anything like the above, though, it’s a goner.

Just as an aside. One of my two distant friends phoned me up last night, to check that I was all right. She says she will call me once a week from now on, just to touch base. The awfulness and wonderfulness of this is – that this is the same friend who has struggled all her life with bouts of clinical depression. I have witnessed – from the outside – the horrors she has gone through. I have visited her in a hospital ward, surrounded by mad people. I have found her sobbing behind her computer in the office we shared. I never, really, had any idea what to do for the best. Yet she was the one who called me.

Things are [Utterly Messed Up]

Plague-wise and every-other-wise, things are going from bad to worse. This no longer surprises or depresses me. My father used to quote some music-hall comedian – I haven’t been able to find it on Google – hopefully I didn’t just imagine it! I’ll expunge the B word in case innocent kiddies are reading, however unlikely that may be, since they all hang out on Insta or PeeWee or Grommit, or whatever:

“Life were [utterly messed up] when I came into it and no doubt it will be
[utterly messed up] when I go.”

I placed my Tesco order. They have no delivery slots until Saturday. Everybody putting in massive orders for quilted toilet paper, I suppose. Toilet paper has become the staff of life, more precious than bread, milk or cheese.

I have enough to live on, if I have to self-isolate. I have a cat-food mountain, for the mountain of cats. They chomp and slurp their way through ten tins a day. I also have a cat in the bath. She’s a bit off – sneezing, etc – more likely cat flu than some hypothetical cat-coronavirus – and the bath is cool. If I hoist her out, she relocates instantly to the wash-hand basin. If I decide to clean my teeth or – yes – wash my hands yet again and slather on the magic stinky pink stuff the vet introduced me to (Hibiscrub) I have to remove a miserable, moulting, watery-eyed moggie first.

It is rumoured that within the next week to ten days, ‘the elderly’ and vulnerable will be advised to self-isolate regardless. I do not regard myself as one of ‘the elderly’ but technically I suppose I do fit into both the age and dodgy immune system category, so I suppose that’ll be me, and the cat-mountain, cut off from society.

In some ways I don’t mind. My whole life, since I tunnelled out of the work-prison, seems to have been an attempt to avoid other human beings. When I’m alone I have some dignity. Forced to mix with other people I turn into this kind of clown-figure. I never know quite what I am going to say next or what new risible/embarrassing mistake I am likely to make. So, though I can get ‘cabin fever’ like everyone else, and appreciate the need to mingle occasionally for the benefit one’s mental health, I don’t feel compelled to.

My biggest problem will be my disabled friend, who lives an inconveniently short distance from me. She climbs the walls if she can’t interact with at least nine or ten people per day, preferably at great length, in person. Her health is also ‘compromised’ and she catches everything. Then, next time I have to take her anywhere in my car, she gives it to me. So what do I do, if she asks me for a lift to the hospital? What do I do if she’s running out of groceries because ‘they’ won’t allow her to use a computer? I suppose you just have to ‘play it by ear’. I don’t like playing things by ear, but you have to, sometimes.

Then there’s my own appointments – blood tests, specialist – coming up soon. Do I stay at home, hiding from germs, or do I venture forth and swim around in a sea of illnesses and infections at two separate hospitals, trying not to breathe in? Playing it by ear, again.

Part of me, though, is attracted to the drama of it. Part of me is angry and terminally bored and longs for the romance of some great disaster – a plague, a crashing stock-market, global meltdown or whatever. How weird is that?

I’ve been reading up about the village of Eyam, in Nottinghamshire. In the 17th Century, the Plague was sweeping through Britain. The disease came to Eyam and the villagers, lead by their vicar, decided to isolate themselves in their village to protect neighbouring villages. On the outskirts of the village there was a Boundary stone. The villagers left money in the holes in the stone, and people from the surrounding area left provisions there, to keep them going. The Earl of Devonshire also helped support them. In the course of  fourteen months, 260 out of 800 isolated villagers would die. People agreed to bury their own dead, close to their own homes, rather than in consecrated ground.

People may be a pain, but some of them are noble too.

Gotta Go…

My friend, though older than me (which is saying something) is always several steps ahead, technologically speaking. She was texting before I was really sure what texting was, etc, etc. But then, if my baby sister hadn’t worked in a bank and told me where to shove my card and what buttons to press, I probably still wouldn’t be using ATM machines. Cautious Clarissa, that’s me – Behind-The-Curve-Betsy.

Today I had coffee with my techno-friend (and another) and we had a pleasant, catching-up sort of chat. After an hour or so she glanced at her smart watch. It was instructing her to stand up. She had been sitting too long, it said.

It struck me that a watch like this could be the perfect excuse for getting away from places you were fed up with being in. Not that my friend was tiring of sitting in a noisy café having a mug of over-strong tea with me, of courseprobably – but if she had been…

I began to think of all the other ways people use to escape from one another:

“I mustn’t keep you. Sure you’ve got plenty to do…”

“Must rush, I believe I left the broccoli boiling!”

“Goodness! Is that the time? My dog is waiting for her bowl of biscuits.”

I recall a friend of Ex’s who was having a bit of a thing with the wife of a not-very-nice man know to all of us. She would telephone Ex’s friend late at night to whisper sweet, anguished whatevers down the phone. If we happened to be at his flat and time was getting on he’d say: “Don’t like to throw you out, but my Old Auntie promised to call.”

Ex and I had an unspoken arrangement that if  I desperately wanted to go home I would start looking at him, meaningfully. In those days I couldn’t drive and so couldn’t leave before he did. Also I had – and still have – a very low boredom threshold, whereas he specialised in, well, being boring. Or at least, with a beer or two under his belt, holding forth about this and that until people’s eyes began to glaze over. I had heard every single one of these monologues before. I could have recited them word for word.

So, I would start giving him these pained, meaningful glances around ten o’clock, but by then he was in full swing, with captive audience. At one o’clock I would have given up on the meaningful glances and would be pleating the edge of my skirt, then letting it go again, pleating it, letting it go. Attempting the Zen thing, which I had been reading up on – going with the flow, reminding myself that all things shall eventually pass, even my husband’s explanation about how torque operates in the rotary blades of helicopters… The watch of my techno-wiz friend also, at intervals, reminds her to breathe. I didn’t know one could forget, but I suppose it means Pause, Be Calm, Om! Think Of England or whatever.

Canadian sister shares my short-little-span-of-attention and is no good at hiding it. If she gets fed up in company she will fall completely silent and stare at the wall, like a deactivated robot. English sister, on the other hand, is ultra-skilled in that department. Before she can become even the teensiest bit bored she sabotages the person who is beginning to ramble on. She changes the subject with a swift brutality. I have, in the past, been on the receiving end. After a moment or two, you think “Hang on – wasn’t I just talking about…?” Apparently it’s a customer-service telephone technique she learned at the bank.

I’m somewhere in the middle. I get terribly, terribly bored but can neither rudely “deactivate” nor be rude to the bore. I suffer in silence, wearing an expression of utter fascination.

Many years ago, I would be repeatedly buttonholed in the pub by a man with a big nose who smoked cigars and breathed cigar-breath over me. He would brace his arm against the wall over my right shoulder and kind of lean in. There was no escape. He alternated between telling me how he once dug up a buried motorbike – an Indian-something – and telling me stories involving other women and their operations, in terribly accurate gynaecological detail. Ex would make lurid faces behind the man’s back but made no attempt to rescue me.

And earlier this week I spent a good hour sat in the Hospital atrium next to the stinkiest of unwashed bag ladies whilst she reeled off a long list of all the famous stars of the sixties screen whose children she had been nanny to, and how fond they all were of her, and grateful they all were to her, and how she bumped into them many years later on the Charing Cross Road…

However, I did get a short story out of that one.

Why, why, why, Delilah?

So I’m sitting in the waiting room at the little hospital – where my doctor’s happens to be. The lighty-up thingy above the receptionist’s desk isn’t working, for which I am thankful.  Some long-ago receptionist misheard Mrs – or possibly Ms – for Miss when entering my details for the first time, so the lighty-up thing converts me into a Miss, every single time. When it lights up I have to skulk off down the corridor conscious of all those pitying glances at my back.

Poor old soul, never had a man. Sent back unopened, etc.

Since there is no lighty-up thing today I need to keep my eye on the corridor ahead, since the doctor – or in my case nurse-practitioner, whatever that is – will have to come out in person and shout for me. I have an unobstructed view ahead until…

‘Delilah. Isn’t she sweet? Only born a couple of weeks ago.’

Blocking my view, suddenly, are a mother and daughter, possibly the largest and most look-alike mother and daughter combo I have ever seen. My God, they are so fat. They are also both wearing at least half a ton of make-up. How long did it take them to plaster that lot on? At least an hour each. It must be social media. Everyone feels they’ve got to look like a Kardashian before they leave the house.

Delilah is a po-faced moppet in a shawl and pink cap thing. She is overburdened with ‘product’, as I think they now call it. So many pink garments. Earrings. Frills. On the floor is a two-tone beige carrier thing, with handle. Looks like the Rolls Royce of carrier-things. Baby Delilah and those two gigantic mumsy bottoms are inches from my nose. Like Mr Bean I try to crane my neck around them slowly, so slowly that I won’t be perceived as critically craning. My nurse-practitioner is running fourteen minutes late. In any case Delilah, her besotted attendants and expensive equipment-mountain get called in before me.

I am glad I got the nurse. Many sad years of experience have taught me that all medical practitioners are going to end up faintly despising me. I just can’t communicate in those staccato, scientific sentences medical and normal people use. I have to start way back in the story and sort of creep up to it. Then suddenly veer away from it at the last moment, then finish it, in a breathless rush. When they start trying to logicalize and coherentize me it’s fatal. Either I gabble faster still or turn into Eeyore and stare at the wall, not listening.

But women doctors despise me for fewer things. Both men and women medical-types get impatient with me for being odd, incoherent, long-winded, unnaturally anxious, gabbling and therefore probably hypochondriac. But men doctors also despise me for being female – therefore certainly neurotic- and past reproductive age, therefore incipiently senile. Not worth glancing up from the computer.

I try to explain to her the excruciating pain in my hip, which I am convinced, having looked it all up on the internet, is either Arthritis or some deadly form of You Know What.

Well, it’s not You Know What, she says. Otherwise it would go on hurting even when you were lying down, now wouldn’t it?

Maybe Arthritis? I venture. More likely Sciatica, she says. Hmm – Sciatica doesn’t match the internet I think – but of course, do not say. Doesn’t much matter either way, she says. Treatment’s the same. Painkillers. Patience.

I have to hang on to the receptionist’s desk for a few seconds on the way out; since I am once more vertical the waves of agony are washing over me.

I have to pause on one of the chairs in the waiting room until it subsides again. No sign of Delilah and her entourage.

I have to sit down on one of the squashy chairs outside the pharmacy before I can go in and queue for a packet of Ibuprofen. In the pharmacy, while some woman takes her time deciding between this type of sticky plasters or that – I attempt to stand upright rather than cringing forward or quietly screaming. I wonder if I look pale and drawn, like the heroine of a Victorian novel. Suspect I look irritable and yellow.

The car-park was full to bursting when I arrived, in fact cars were blocking in other cars and littering the muddy grass verges all the way up the drive. My little car ended up more or less abandoned at the last minute in a tiny residential street opposite the hospital. I had to limp uphill for a muddy quarter of a mile or so to keep my appointment.

When I come out I collapse at the bus stop for a while, thinking the bus might come along in a minute or two and might give me a lift down to the end of the drive, though it would mean explaining the whole thing in front of a busload of earwigging strangers.

No bus arrives. Eventually I heave myself up and hobble off down the driveway. I have never been quite so pleased to unlock the driver’s side door and tumble in behind the wheel. Then the bus arrives.

Painkillers. Patience.

Boggarts In My Back Garden

Ow, I have just been landed on by the three-legged cat, and when you have been landed on by a three-legged cat, you know it. He does like to push the keyboard back in, on its slidey-shelf, so I end up with access to the bottom two rows only.

I thought I would let you know about the writing. I have been very good, surprisingly, producing a rough version of one of my little flash fictions every day. Today I started on part II of my plan, which was to also second-edit one. It’s a system, you see. I have a stack of plastic trays and the printed out stories progress down the trays until they settle, sedimentishly, in REJ – rejected. Of course, if any were to stick at ACC, the tray above REJ, I would be extremely pleased.

I am planning to publish more stories on the blog, but have to start being disciplined about it. The aim of writing them was to try to get them published in internet flash fiction magazines, maybe even earn a cent or two. Research suggests it would only be a cent or two, too.

But when I first attempted to publish an e-book of – longer, older – short stories on Kindle I had problems. Amazon’s automated-bot-crawling-thing became convinced that I had filched my short stories from some other writer. They refused to publish the book and started emailing me, rather scarily, like I was a criminal.

I had to do quite a bit of panic-stricken emailing back before they/it accepted that ‘I’ was in fact ‘Me’ – ie the Elsewhere their had software had detected my stories in was Here. I’ve long since deleted that e-book anyway – approximately three and a half people bought it – but all the stories it contained are here. See dedicated Page at top of blog/menu for how to find them.

Anyway, my plan is to put up a new very-short-story every two weeks. That way I’ll still have the pleasure of sharing stories with you and getting your feedback. If I can continue to write one story a day there should be plenty to spare.

What else? That’s the trouble, nothing non-fictional ever seems to happen to me anymore. That’s the trouble with getting old, at least without money. The high spot – last night I had to pick up my down-the-road friend from the hairdressers in town. She likes to go to the training college, because it’s cheaper, but they are very, very slow – take aeons to complete a single hairdo to the satisfaction of their supervisors. Plus they only open on Wednesdays afternoons and evenings, finishing after the last bus has gone. So I have to wait for a text, jump in the car and drive for 25 minutes, at night, with all those headlights coming towards me. When I would normally be watching some rubbish film on Prime, or dozing.

I never did much like going out at night, especially in winter. I know it’s the same things and places exactly, only with less sunlight, but it doesn’t feel like that. The world seems altogether a different place when it’s dark. Things may be lurking in my garden when I come back. I am afraid to turn away from them to put my key in the lock, and so I fumble. Yes, readers, there are boggarts on my back lawn and they are creeping

I’d better be careful about that or I might end up like Mum. She was absolutely sure there were people, out there behind her drawn curtains, standing in the dark, invisible but watching. How terrifying a genuine psychosis must be. Note to self: remain sane.

Another elderly acquaintance phoned this morning after a long gap. She always looks kind of, well, you know, at death’s door. I hadn’t seen her over Christmas as expected, and for a horrible-creepy-man related reason I wasn’t able to phone her at home to check she was all right. The longer the silence went on the more dead I feared she must be. However, she phoned this morning and she’s not. Not that I actually asked her if she was. She isn’t too well, though.

And tomorrow – tomorrow I think it is lunch with above nocturnally-coiffed down-the-road friend, in the subterranean canteen of the local hospital. It’s a bit like eating in a fish tank. Unfortunately since I have gone gluten-free I am confined to cheese-baked-potato with whatever vegetables they happen to have. Nothing much else is safe. I now have to have cheese-baked-potatoes everywhere I go, whilst others are consuming heaped, delicious steaming great platefuls of pie, chips, pasta and so forth. I will soon begin to look like a baked potato.

To make it even more exciting, we might have to take a ticket and wait for several hours so that she can get her blood test. Note to self: take a book.

Instead of a handbag…

The Rusty Post Box

Well, I have voted. I am registered for a postal vote and they arrive about two weeks before the election. I could actually walk the dull, fifteen minute walk to the village hall to cast my vote among my fellow villagers but it’s just – so depressing. So, I climbed the dull, two minute climb up the hill to the Rusty Post Box to post my vote – I always return it the same day, before any cat can widdle or vomit on it, or decide to shred it for the pure catty amusement of it.

It was several years before I dared risk inserting anything into the mouth of the Rusty Post Box, assuming the Post Office had abandoned it to its fate, forever to moulder beside the overflowing, never emptied litter bin, steadily encroached upon by vicious triffid brambles from a nearby garden… I have never seen a place like this for Things Falling Apart. It’s almost artistic.

Have you ever thrown a book away?

This was a question posed in a Radio 4 broadcast yesterday. I must say – yes, and no. I recently managed a mass throw-out and taking-to-charity shops. However, a good two thirds of my book collection remained, mouldering in the garage. I only managed it by not stopping to look at what I was throwing into the bags-for-life. However, then I chickened out, and now I have a house full of the remaining books, comfortably warm and dry, but with weird gaps. One or two books missing from a run of the same author, books, like missing teeth. All that random throwing out… So of course I am having to replace them.

It made me think of The Life Of King George V. This is the worse book ever but I find myself unable to throw it out. It came in a job lot with the £2 Odhams’ Encyclopaedia, which I did want. I suspect the owner was glad to get rid of it. It is the ghastliest, grubbiest, dullest, most foxed, most sycophantically fulsome old book I have ever had the misfortune to come across, full of full page brown, smelly old pictures of Royalty in all their medals and jewels, looking unforgiving. To give you just a taste:

The next year saw the King “do his bit” in another way. He gave £100,000 out of his private fortune to the Exchequer to be used for the prosecution of war. It was a notable gesture of self-sacrifice in the common cause, and the extent to which this generous gift crippled the King’s resources was shown by the difficulties of the Royal Household after the war.

So it goes through his life, year by year, one praiseworthy Kingly deed after another. But can I throw it out? No. I find myself hovering with the filthy, dusty old thing over the waste bin. Can I let go of it? It’s managed to survive this long with nobody reading it, nobody caring about it… etc.

Instead of a handbag

Another marathon conversation with Canadian Sister last night. She worries about things, and because she always had a husband to make decisions for her she struggles to make even the smallest them now.

I have to take all of my course artwork in to the University in a suitcase later today (they’re many hours behind us in Edmonton) My tutor won’t give me a grade if I don’t, but the suitcase with all the paintings in it is so heavy I don’t know how I’m going to manage it on the train. All those steps to drag it up…

Is there a lift – sorry, elevator – at the station?

Well, I haven’t seen one.

Wouldn’t somebody be likely to help you up the steps with the case? I mean, in this country if a woman is struggling up a flight of steps with a child in a pushchair, someone will always grab the bottom of the pushchair and help her with it.

I don’t think they do that sort of thing in Canada. They’re more likely to yell at me for blocking the staircase. It’s quite narrow, you see.

But I thought Canadians were all so courteous. I mean, they’re famous for it! What about that beautiful Mountie chap from Down South? Aren’t all Canadians like him?

Someone did help me with a case once, at the airport, on my way over to England. In fact he grabbed the whole huge travel trunk and ran off with it up the stairs. I thought he had stolen it, like, instead of my handbag or something. I was in a terrible panic, but he was there waiting for me at the top of the stairs.

What about a taxi?

Oh yes, they do have taxis at the station… But what if the taxi-driver should be a rapist?

Poor Rosie

Rosie, I am afraid, is becoming incontinent. Well, she is incontinent. You probably don’t want to know this but – I’ve started so I’ll finish. Every time I sit down I have to check the end of sofa Rosie and I share – luckily a third-hand and leather(ish) sofa – for little puddles and dribbles of poo. Every time she sits on my lap I forget to grab a cushion or put something between me and her. Consequently I am washing a pair of jeans every day, in fact sometimes twice a day. Just can’t bring myself to open the door to the postman adorned in driblets of poo. Mind you, I could be wearing an orange wig and full clown make-up and it wouldn’t register with the postman.

Poor Rosie, she has been my light and salvation for eighteen years and I’m not getting rid of her now she has become a little inconvenient. If only they had the same sort of thing for cats as they have for my Mum and her fellow inmates. Maybe they do, but I wouldn’t have her suffer the indignity.